MCIU MARKS WORLD MALARIA DAY
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MCIU MARKS WORLD MALARIA DAY

MCIU MARKS WORLD MALARIA DAY

Malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by parasites that are transmitted to people through the mosquito bites. About half of the world population is at risk of malaria, particularly those in lower-income countries. It infects more than 500 million people each year and kills more than one million people, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). However, Malaria is preventable and curable.

 

The World Health Assembly instituted the World Malaria Day in May 2007 to give countries in affected regions a chance to learn from each other’s experiences and support one another’s efforts. World Malaria Day also enables new donors to join in a global partnership against malaria, and for research and academic institutions to reveal scientific advances to the public. The day also gives international partners, companies and foundations a chance to showcase their efforts and reflect on how to scale up what has worked.

Nigeria is one of the highest burden countries accounting for over 27% of global malaria cases. According to researchers, there are an estimated 100 million malaria cases with over 300,000 deaths per year in Nigeria. This year’s World Malaria Day comes on the heels of two major malaria events – the Commonwealth Heads of Government meeting, where UK Prime Minister Theresa May and other Commonwealth leaders made a commitment to halve malaria burden across 53 member countries by 2023 in response to the London Malaria Summit.

In addition, the Multilateral Initiative on Malaria (MIM) conference in Dakar brought together scientists and researchers from across Africa to share the latest innovations in the fight against the disease.

According to Tedros Ghebreyesus, Director-General World Health Organization, the “World Malaria Day reminds us of the challenges that remain.”

“The declining trend in malaria cases and deaths has stalled and vital funding for malaria programmes has flatlined. If we continue along this path, we will lose the gains for which we have fought so hard.

“We call on countries and the global health community to close the critical gaps in the malaria response. Together we must ensure that no one is left behind in accessing lifesaving services to prevent, diagnose and treat malaria.”, he said

Here at MCIU, we are passionate about our host community. We are creating awareness for a healthy environment by advocating the use of mosquito nets and keeping a clean environment.

MICHAEL AND CECILIA IBRU UNIVERSITY

Ibru Village
Agbarha – Otor
Ughelli North
Delta State
Nigeria

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